A mighty wine time in Elizabeth

Yearly event brings people together and marks town's birthday

Posted 10/11/18

Conversation and tasting stopped briefly as those attending the Oct. 6 Wine in the Pines event joined in singing “Happy Birthday” to the Town of Elizabeth. Grace Erickson, Elizabeth community …

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A mighty wine time in Elizabeth

Yearly event brings people together and marks town's birthday

Posted

Conversation and tasting stopped briefly as those attending the Oct. 6 Wine in the Pines event joined in singing “Happy Birthday” to the Town of Elizabeth.

Grace Erickson, Elizabeth community development director, said this is the fourth year for the event that is a community social event as well as a time to mark the city's birthday. Elizabeth traces its roots to a sawmill established in 1855. The town was platted in May 1882 and the town with a population of 300 was incorporated on Oct. 10, 1890.

Again this year the wineries set up their booths on the Gesin's Market lot on Main Street. A small admission provided the opportunity to taste the vintages from the wineries.

Douglas County resident Frank Paulson said last year was the first time he attended Wine in the Pines.

“A friend told me about the event last year, I like wine and decided to check it out,” Paulson said. “I really enjoy the wine and the event. You don't get a lot of chances to learn about several different wineries like you do here. I also like that I get to taste wines I might not ever know about. I think the event is a good idea for the wineries and for people like me who like to check out different kinds of wine.”

Wineries included Elbert County's Three Bridge Wines as well as Vino Colorado from Colorado Springs.

Avanti Winery of Littleton had a booth. Michelle Cole of Outback Liquors staffed the booth early in the event

Cole said events like Wine in the Pines were a good opportunity for the winery because often they see people they might not meet otherwise and offer them the chance to taste their wines.

While most of the focus was on wine tasting, the event also was held to mark the anniversary of Elizabeth's founding.

The roots of the city date back to about 1855 when the Weber Brothers established a sawmill on Running Creek. There was a rush of people who came to the area in 1858 when gold was discovered in Running Creek. However the amount of gold was small so the “gold rush” didn't last long and most of those who were part of the rush left.

A flood wiped out the original Elizabeth location in 1859 but most settlers remained and set up around a new location that is near where Elizabeth is today.

The town was platted in May 1882 and incorporated as a town on Oct. 10, 1890.

Elizabeth became important for the surrounding area because the city was a stop on the railroad which ran came from the south. The depot at Elizabeth provided the opportunities for farmers to bring their crops and ranchers their cattle to town and place them on the train to Denver.

There was a family located in Elbert County that owned a carnival. According to newspaper reports the family brought their carnival to Elizabeth in the early summer, loaded it on the train and traveled around the area. When the summer carnival season ended the carnival was brought back by train to Elizabeth and stored away until the next year.

However in 1935 a flood wiped out the railroad tracks in the area and they were never rebuilt.

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