Elizabeth High School grants 131 diplomas

Class of 2018 had 13 valedictorians; scholarships totaled about $1.6 million

Posted 6/3/18

Bright sunlight bathed the stadium as an overflow crowd of family and friends watched the Elizabeth High School commencement ceremonies on May 26 in the school's stadium. The 131 members of the Class …

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Elizabeth High School grants 131 diplomas

Class of 2018 had 13 valedictorians; scholarships totaled about $1.6 million

Posted

Bright sunlight bathed the stadium as an overflow crowd of family and friends watched the Elizabeth High School commencement ceremonies on May 26 in the school's stadium.

The 131 members of the Class of 2018 donned their robes in the school colors, red for the young men and white for the young women. In keeping with tradition, the robed faculty members led the graduating seniors as they marched into the stadium and down the steps to their seats on the field as the school band played “Pomp and Circumstance.”

Principal Ron McClendon gave opening remarks and class officers Catherine Witten, Erika Riedmuller, Jacob Bohler and Hannah Farthing shared master of ceremonies duties.

The next item on the program was the valedictorian presentations. Thirteen members of the Class of 2018 with 4.0 or higher grade-point averages were named valedictorians. Each valedictorian received a bronze eagle sculpture. All valedictorians had the opportunity to make a presentation. Valedictorian Carli Huffine sang when it was her turn at the microphone and the other valedictorians made speeches.

Honors earned by the graduates were presented, and it was announced that scholarships awarded to the members of the Class of 2018 amounted to about $1.6 million.

Then it was time for presentation of diplomas and tossing caps into the air. The graduates then marched out of the stadium and gathered on the lawn in front of the school to meet with friends and family.

“This is one of the biggest days of my life and I am really going to miss Elizabeth High School,” graduate Peyton Randle said after the ceremonies. “Today was exciting and a little scary. I am a little scared about going to college at the University of Colorado-Boulder but I am also really looking forward to it.”

She said she plans to study business and her goal is to go into international business because she likes business and she likes to travel.

“I have been fortunate to travel quite a bit,” she said. “I have been to Mexico, some Central American countries and Europe. As a matter of fact, I am going back to Europe in a few weeks.”

Classmate Ryver Gaudreault agreed graduation day was exciting and a little scary.

“Today is very special and I am glad I have a ton of friends and family here today,” he said. “I think it is great for a small town like Elizabeth to have ceremonies like this. Getting through high school wasn't all that hard for me. Oh, there were some hard classes, but they weren't too hard.”

He said overall his years at Elizabeth High School went well for him. He added that he really enjoyed being a member of the Cardinals wrestling team. He said the sport and training were demanding but rewarding. He said had his best season as a wrestler when he almost made it to state.

“Right now I don't have any firm plans for the future,” he said. “I do plan to go to a trade school but I am not sure what trade I want to pursue. So I have to make that decision then check to see what school schools are available. I going to take a little time, travel and relax a little while I look around to see what is available before I decide where to attend classes.”

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