Elizabeth Library gets Founding Era grant

Staff report
Posted 7/9/18

The Elizabeth Library recently received a Revisiting the Founding Era Grant to host public activities and conversations that explore America’s founding and its enduring themes. As part of the …

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Elizabeth Library gets Founding Era grant

Posted

The Elizabeth Library recently received a Revisiting the Founding Era Grant to host public activities and conversations that explore America’s founding and its enduring themes.

As part of the grant, Elizabeth Library received several books that contain works about the founding era, money to help facilitate learning and conversation, and other resources from the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and the American Library Association.

Using these grant resources, the Elizabeth Library will launch a two-part series on the Founding Era.

Events will include:

• July 20: “Dissent and National Security in the Founding Era,” hosted by Douglas County School District instructors Brian Fleet (AP Government, US History) and Jess Van Divier (AP Government, World History).

• Sept. 21: “Communication and Persuasion,” hosted by Elbert County Judge Palmer Boyette, and his son Andrew P. Boyette.

Revisiting the Founding Era is a three-year national initiative of The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, presented in partnership with the American Library Association and the National Constitution Center, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The grant provides 100 public libraries across the country the opportunity to use historical documents to spark public conversations about the Founding Era’s enduring ideas and themes and how they continue to influence our lives today. For more information about Revisiting the Founding Era and participating libraries, visit www.foundingera.org.

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