Former postal employee indicted on suspicion of Englewood mail thefts

Allegations of mail not received in Englewood date back to February

Posted 9/28/18

Former postal employee Randy L. Younger was indicted related to mail thefts in Englewood on Sept. 27, according to the Office of Inspector General for the U.S. Postal Service.

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Former postal employee indicted on suspicion of Englewood mail thefts

Allegations of mail not received in Englewood date back to February

Posted
Former postal employee Randy L. Younger was indicted related to mail theft in Englewood on Sept. 27, according to the Office of Inspector General for the U.S. Postal Service.

Younger, 47, was arrested by OIG agents Sept. 28, according to Jeffrey Krafels, deputy special agent in charge for the OIG Western Area Field Office in the Denver area.

Previously, the OIG said a mail carrier was under investigation after agents received allegations in February that customers were not getting mail in Englewood, according to that office.
 
Agents identified the employee suspected of the thefts on June 6 — now known to be Younger — and he was put in a “non-pay, non-duty status,” said David Rupert, spokesman for the USPS in Colorado.

The complaints in February originated at the post office at 915 W. Lehigh Ave., not far southeast of West Hampden Avenue and South Santa Fe Drive, according to the OIG.

No complaints at other Denver-area post offices, or employees of those post offices, were involved in the investigation of the employee identified on June 6, Krafels said previously. He did not say how many people brought complaints about mail going missing since February.

Complaints related to the Lehigh Avenue post office had continued even after June 6, when Younger was put on non-duty status, according to Krafels. But the OIG is confident only one person was involved in the Englewood thefts since February, he said.

U.S. attorney's offices are generally in charge of prosecuting suspected mail theft. A U.S. attorney is the chief federal law-enforcement officer in their district of the country.

Theft or possession of stolen mail is punishable by up to five years in prison and fines up to $250,000, and employees convicted of theft stand to lose their jobs, according to the OIG.

The OIG emphasized that the "vast majority of postal personnel are dedicated, hard-working public servants" who don't engage in theft.

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