Letter to the editor: Rethink current pay system

Posted 1/9/19

Rethink current pay system For several years, the minimum wage has increased, with the goal of $12 per hour. In relation to the increased costs – food and housing, specifically – have increased, …

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Letter to the editor: Rethink current pay system

Posted

Rethink current pay system

For several years, the minimum wage has increased, with the goal of $12 per hour. In relation to the increased costs – food and housing, specifically – have increased, and when the numbers are reviewed, a question: What was gained?

The time has come to eliminate the minimum wage. The time has come to dismiss the opinion that entitlement determines an individual’s worth. The time has come to associate what an individual is paid with education and experience.

Instead of the minimum wage: a student wage. A modest sum, with conditions: In order to earn more, the student must agree to learn and demonstrate competency relevant to their job. For example, a student who takes on a part-time job as a dishwasher in a restaurant will agree to learn and follow requirements relevant to their position: health department regulations, workplace safety, etc. As they succeed, their pay increases.

When a student graduates high school and pursues higher education in the form of a trade school, a junior college, a four-year degree, they would again be paid a student wage, which would increase based on experience and performance results as well as current efforts. After completing their education they would gain employment based on a salary because their pay would be determined as a result of education and experience, and it would increase as they continue to fulfill relevant educational requirements and gain experience. In the free market, such a model would encourage employers to acquire and retain qualified and competent employees.

James C. Hess

Loveland

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