Littleton

`See What is Unseen’ set to intrigue gallery visitors

Littleton exhibit of various artworks puts focus on concept of mystery

Posted 2/12/18

In Littleton, Stanton Gallery curators Moira Casey and Karina Elrod have searched for art that is a bit mysterious to coordinate with Town Hall Arts Center’s latest production, the musical …

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Littleton

`See What is Unseen’ set to intrigue gallery visitors

Littleton exhibit of various artworks puts focus on concept of mystery

Posted

In Littleton, Stanton Gallery curators Moira Casey and Karina Elrod have searched for art that is a bit mysterious to coordinate with Town Hall Arts Center’s latest production, the musical “Something’s Afoot,” a spoof of Agatha Christie’s mysteries, which opens Feb. 23 at Town Hall Arts Center. “See What is Unseen,” with wall sculptures and paintings inspired by the concept of mystery, will fill the gallery through March 27, with an artists’ reception from 5:30-7 p.m. on March 2. Artists Deborah Howard, Mark Johnston and Kalliopi Monoyios will present their artworks.

Deborah Howard, who studied at the Rhode Island School of Design and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, heads the painting program at the University of Denver. She exhibited “Migration and Memory” at the Venice (Italy) Jewish Museum in 2017. It included shoe sculptures and textiles printed with her paintings and photographs of the Ghetto and ancient and modern Jewish cemeteries on the Lido. The exhibit addressed migration as “universal and natural to human beings to survive and evolve since the beginning of time” (versus emigration and immigration—political constructs). Her 2003-2008 project: “Portraits of Child Holocaust Survivors” will soon be permanently placed in the Beck Collection at the University of Denver.

Kalliopi Monoyios is a fine artist and illustrator whose work explores a deep fascination with the natural world — and our connection to it. In 2011, she was invited to co-found “Symbiartic,” a science and art blog for Scientific American, and “began to immerse herself in the growing movement of “scienceart,” the intersection of science and art. (Look online at the blog — blogs.scientificamerican.com/symbiartic — a treasure trove!) She has recently exhibited her work at the Art Students League of Denver and Littleton’s 2016 “Own an Original.”

Mark Johnston, an Evergreen resident, is active in Art Students League of Denver and Center for the Arts, Evergreen. He writes: “A diverse background in construction and construction management taught me multiple disciplines that have led me to art … and mixed media is my direction.” He has sought out art communities on the East Coast, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Gulf Coast (Katrina response), France, Switzerland and Evergreen.

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