‘This can be a turnaround moment for them’

Hospital offering services in addiction, mental health is set to open this month

Posted 7/14/17

Metro-area residents will soon have another option for substance abuse and mental health services: Denver Springs Hospital, scheduled to open in unincorporated Arapahoe County in late July, will offer inpatient and outpatient treatment services to …

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‘This can be a turnaround moment for them’

Hospital offering services in addiction, mental health is set to open this month

Posted

Metro-area residents will soon have another option for substance abuse and mental health services: Denver Springs Hospital, scheduled to open in unincorporated Douglas County in late July, will offer inpatient and outpatient treatment services to meet a growing demand of patients struggling with addiction, depression, anxiety and other issues.

“We have put a lot of resources into programming and the environment that a lot of other hospitals don’t have,” said clinical director Bill Snyder, who said the center’s treatment options will include pet therapy, music therapy, yoga, nutrition, art therapy and an interfaith chaplain.

Treatment will employ the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy model, helping patients change negative thought patterns to improve how they cope with challenging situations. Anonymous group therapy is a large component of the CBT model, and each unit of the facility includes a community room for sessions.

Patients will also have the option of using outpatient treatment and Cognit, a web-based therapy service.

David Morris, CEO of Denver Springs and a former licensed clinical social worker, said the primary function is to provide a safe place for patients to start over.

“We’re taking them into a controlled, safe environment,” he said. “Then we can get some insight into why someone’s feeling that desperate or out-of-control and help them develop new coping mechanisms.”

About half the patients accepted will use third-party insurers to pay, Morris said, and 40 to 50 percent of patients’ treatment will be paid for by government programs, though that is “totally up in the air” pending congressional efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

He stressed that anyone who comes through the doors for help will be seen, regardless of means.

“We don’t want to be siloed away as a private hospital,” he said. “If someone shows up for care, we’ll treat them, regardless of payment.”

The hospital is at 8835 American Way, near E-470 and Peoria Road. Six therapists and 75 staffers are already on board, with more to come, according to community relations director Ethan Dexter.

The facility features four units: one for substance abuse detoxification and rehabilitation, one for adult mental health treatment and one for adolescent mental health treatment. One unit is still unoccupied and will be designated after staff evaluates which types of service are needed, Dexter said.

Rooms in the inpatient unit are double occupancy and handicap-accessible, and can accommodate up to 96 patients at a time. Outdoor areas feature xeriscaped walkways and a basketball court while the interior is decorated with warm color schemes and an open design.

Therapist Kate Breslin said the staff’s goal is to help anyone who has made the difficult choice to seek help realize they did the right thing.

“This can be a really low moment for them,” Breslin said. “We want to get them to see that they made the right choice and this can be a turnaround moment for them.”

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