A sweet Saturday in Elizabeth

Harvest fest brings out costumed pets, kids

Posted 10/26/14

When any event is held outdoors in the fall, there is always the risk that the elements will not cooperate. But that was not the case in Elizabeth last weekend.

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A sweet Saturday in Elizabeth

Harvest fest brings out costumed pets, kids

Posted

When any event is held outdoors in the fall, there is always the risk that the elements will not cooperate. But that was not the case in Elizabeth last weekend.

Warm autumn sunshine, a clear Colorado-blue sky, and temperatures in the 70s were just what the chamber of commerce ordered to welcome visitors to the Annual Harvest Street Festival in Elizabeth on Oct. 25.

The day's event began with pets and their owners gathering at Countryside Village Shopping Center for the annual Pet Costume Contest. Claudia Henning, owner of the Magic Dog Pet Store, has held the contest for 10 years, and she and her panel of judges chose winners in six categories, ranging from the most unusual to the scariest pet and owner costumes. Gift baskets stuffed with pet-friendly treats went to the winners of each category.

This year's grand prize went to Mysti, a 1-year-old mini horse, and her owner Kelley Harding, of Silma, for their traditional witch costumes complete with striped stockings and traditional black pointed hats.

Across town, more than 35 vendors set up tents and booths lining the center of Main Street, while local shop owners displayed goods and more importantly, candy for the thousand or so visitors that began filling thoroughfare just before noon.

“This is a big family event and safe for our little goblins. There is pumpkin decorating, vendor booths, games for the kids, and candy, a lot of candy,” said Peg Kelly, director of the Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce, who joined the spirit of the festivities by sporting a Red Cross nurse uniform complete with classic nurse's hat.

While the adults had the opportunity to cast their vote for their favorite new logo for the Town of Elizabeth, catch up with friends, or try homemade apple butter, the kids were focused on the big draw of the day, Trick or Treat Street.

Businesses on Main Street and throughout the rest of the town of Elizabeth offered candy and other goodies to the zombies, superheroes, and pirates prowling the town in the quest of sweet plunder.

Mindy Briddle has participated in Trick-or-Treat Street for the past 12 years, handing out Dots, Skittles, and Milk Duds from her 17-gallon, steel tub set on the bench in front of her husband's custom hat shop.

Briddle says that in all the years that she has participated in Trick or Treat Street, she has never had any candy left over.

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