Commissioners look forward to second terms

Richardson, Thayer won reelection bids by wide margins

Tabatha Stewart
Special to Colorado Community Media
Posted 11/6/20

Elbert County voters overwhelmingly chose incumbent Republican Commissioners Chris Richardson and Grant Thayer over their challengers in the Nov. 3 election. Unofficial results posted on Nov. 4 show …

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Commissioners look forward to second terms

Richardson, Thayer won reelection bids by wide margins

Posted

Elbert County voters overwhelmingly chose incumbent Republican Commissioners Chris Richardson and Grant Thayer over their challengers in the Nov. 3 election.

Unofficial results posted on Nov. 4 show Richardson received 95.9% of the votes cast, and Thayer garnered 74.1%. Republican Scott Lampman ran as a write-in candidate against Richardson, and received 4.1% of the tally. Democrat Kathleen Conway was on the ballot opposing Thayer, and received 25.9% of the votes cast. There are 20,934 active voters in Elbert County, and 17,750 returned ballots.

Richardson on Nov. 4 thanked the community for its vote of confidence, and said he looks forward to another four years of service.

“Every election provides an opportunity for citizens to choose a new direction. I am humbled by the continued support indicated by last night's election returns,” Richardson said. “My pledge to every citizen of our great county remains constant — I will strive for the continuous improvement of county governance and perform my duties in a legal and ethical manner to the best of my abilities. The opportunity to continue to serve our communities is greatly appreciated.”

Thayer on Nov. 4 said he will continue to work toward better transparency and communication with community members.

“I am grateful that the Elbert County community has provided me with the opportunity to continue to serve as Elbert County commissioner, District 3,” Thayer said. “I am dedicated to providing good and transparent government which will help ensure a safe and prosperous future. Thank you, everyone!”

Conway on Nov. 4 said she hopes community members will get involved even though the elections are over, and hold the commissioners to the promises they have made.

“The supporters have been fabulous, those are people from both parties and unaffiliated that have helped and been supportive,” Conway said. “I think if they continue going to the town hall meetings and commissioner meetings, and continue listening to what's going on in their communities … it will be good for them. I think these commissioners need to step up and realize who they work for.”

Lampman on Nov. 4 said he was not surprised by the outcome, but stated that he was disappointed that voters held to a party line versus listening to the intentions of each candidate.

“I hope things change going forward, whether it's more people getting involved, the `Monday morning whiners/squeaky wheels' stepping-up and making a positive difference, the Republicans actually admitting their own incumbent is not performing well, citizens doing some research on the issues, citizens doing research on those running for office, or holding their current elected officials accountable," he said. "Hopefully my home will not run out of water, and my commute to work will not be slowed dramatically by the ever-increasing traffic. I moved here because of the rural atmosphere, and quiet and peaceful way of life. I'd like to see it stay that way for the foreseeable future, but that is certainly in doubt.”

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