My name is... Ron Ferreira

Turning wood into works of art

Posted 8/16/16

Bouncing around and landing in Parker

I moved here four years ago from Tennessee, to be near my granddaughter. I'm originally from Rhode Island, where I met my wife of 43 years, Linda, in high school. We moved from Rhode Island to Tennessee to …

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My name is... Ron Ferreira

Turning wood into works of art

Posted

Bouncing around and landing in Parker

I moved here four years ago from Tennessee, to be near my granddaughter. I'm originally from Rhode Island, where I met my wife of 43 years, Linda, in high school. We moved from Rhode Island to Tennessee to Florida, then back to Tennessee and then to Parker.

My family were all stone masons, so I went into construction management and worked in that field for most of my life. It takes a special class of people, just like firefighters or policemen or anything, to do that work. You have to have the talent and the desire to do those types of jobs. It's hard work, but it's a lot of fun.

Starting strong, staying busy


About 10, 12 or 13 years ago, I started doing woodturning fulltime.

I joined a woodturners club in Florida and within a month they made me the president. I had only joined the club to learn how to sharpen my tools properly, but once I joined the club it opened up a whole new world for me. There were doctors, lawyers, engineers, just an incredible amount of diversity, and they all liked to share their little tricks of the trade.

I was also very fortunate that I met a professional woodturner in the group who took me under his wing and shared his expertise with me, and it just snowballed from there.

Nature is a big part of my work. I'll take a leaf and trace it onto sandpaper, then use it to make an impression on a piece. Then I pyrograph the outline and dye it, and then the leaf becomes alive again in the pieces that I make. I have some pieces like that at the Wildlife Experience space at the University of Colorado south campus and some at Studio J in downtown Denver.

Favorite projects

My daughter works as a teacher at Greenwood Elementary and an apple tree blew down there this spring. The tree was right outside my daughter's classroom and I turned the wood from the tree into four bowls as gifts for teachers at the school.

I get up early, around 3:30, and I usually walk for three miles, then come home, eat breakfast and start my day. I try to complete a project every day, to keep the juices flowing, and that's part of what I learned from my mentor.

It's a long day, but it's a passion, so it's never a tiring day.

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