Stampede days just make ‘your soul happy’

Annual rodeo and festival draws cowpokes of all stripes

Posted 6/11/19

Going to the Elizabeth Stampede without a cowboy hat is a bit like going to the prom in overalls. Thankfully, Glenn Orms was ready to remedy the situation for anyone who arrived hatless. “Most …

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Stampede days just make ‘your soul happy’

Annual rodeo and festival draws cowpokes of all stripes

Posted

Going to the Elizabeth Stampede without a cowboy hat is a bit like going to the prom in overalls.

Thankfully, Glenn Orms was ready to remedy the situation for anyone who arrived hatless.

“Most folks have never worn a custom-fitted hat,” said Orms, proprietor of The Cow Lot cowboy hat shop. “We steam and shape them to fit your particular head.”

Orms was among the many vendors at the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo and festivities held June 6 to June 9 at Casey Jones Park in Elizabeth.

Festivities kicked off June 6 with a concert by Sawyer Brown and special guest Kasey Tyndall. The parade took place June 8.

And the rodeo, one of only a handful of Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association rodeos that qualify to host an Xtreme Bulls competition, ran over the course of the three days, with top riders competing for the tour championship.

The products of Orms’ labor — and those who brought their own — were abundant in the rodeo stands, where throngs howled for bullriders, bronco busters, and toddlers clinging to bucking sheep for dear life.

For some, though, the best place to be wasn’t the beer tent or the midway, but on horseback.

“It’s hard to explain what I get from riding a horse,” said 14-year-old Braylon Briddle of Kiowa, as she rode her horse Millie down Main Street. “It just makes your soul happy.”

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